Trees & Shrubs

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Displaying 41 to 60 of 65 results, sorted alphabetically.
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Podocarpus latifolius (new)

The South African 'Real Yellowwood' forms large trees up to 30m high in the moister mountains of the south, east and north of the country and also Zimbabwe. Attractive slim, linear flattened evergreen foliage emerges pink-red flushed and radiates around the shoots forming an attractive effect. Only hardy in the mildest parts of the British Isles.

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Podocarpus macrophyllus

Native of the Far East, this is one of the hardiest of all Podocarps, withstanding heavy frosts if sited well. Leaves long leathery and narrow, usually up to 13cm, but up to 18cm on vigorous shoots, green above and glaucous beneath. An evergreen shrub or small tree given enough time. Lime tolerant but not suited to chalk.

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Podocarpus salignus Hardy form

Podocarpus salignus Hardy form

From Chile comes this noble evergreen tree, related to the conifers, but with egg shaped fleshy fruits. A medium sized tree eventually with superb rich-green, long, narrow, almost willow-like foliage loading the branches. Elegant and with an exotic appearance, this form has proven hardy in a cold inland Cumbrian (!) garden over many years, given reasonable shelter.

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Polylepis australis - tall form

Polylepis australis - tall form

A fascinating plant from N. Argentina; a member of the Rose family, closely related to Acaena, and with similar pinnate, sea-green foliage, but grows into a small tree eventually, with amazing, pale-brown, flaky-pastry bark. Some leaves turn yellow in autumn with the rest remaining for the winter. Perfectly hardy in many areas. This form is of tree size.

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Populus glauca ex Gaoligongshan

This very rare tree was originally collected in the Gaoligongshan, NW Yunnan. Striking in foliage with large, rounded, blue-green leaves with red veins on flattened red petioles, emerging fairly late in late spring/early summer. Vigorous and hardy, this will make a medium sized tree for most soils.

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Populus glauca KR 3993

This very rare tree was originally collected in Yunnan by Keith Rushforth. Striking in foliage with large, rounded, blue-green leaves with red veins on flattened red petioles, emerging fairly late in late spring. Vigorous and hardy, this will make a medium sized tree for most soils.

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Populus lasiocarpa Hermaphrodite form

A form collected by Ernest Wilson with polygamous catkins. An ornamental medium sized Chinese tree with huge leaves often up to 30cm long, with conspicuous red veins and leaf stalks. Nothing like the huge hybrid Poplars we are so used to seeing in our river valleys, these will form smaller, dome shaped trees. Plants can be coppiced to produce huge foliage.

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Populus purdomii

Described as "extremely rare in cultivation" by Grimshaw in New Trees, this Chinese species makes a healthy, upright, but relatively slow growing tree in cultivation. Leaves are fairly large and emerge red flushed in May, after frosts have passed, retaining a red petiole through the season. Young trees at the Hillier Gardens look distinctive, stylish and handsome.

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Populus szechuanica var. tibetica (new)

Rarely seen, yet one of the most attractive of the Chinese balsam poplars, the leaves being a similar size to the well known and loved P. lasiocarpa. Foliage is elegant and broadly ovate, flushing red in spring and retaining a red midrib, green above and whitish-glaucescent beneath. A strong growing large tree to 20m+ adapted to most soils.

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Populus x wilsocarpa 'Beloni'

As the name suggests, a hybrid between two ornamental, large leaved Chinese species, P. wilsonii and P. lasiocarpa, sharing characters of both. Not a vast tree, though strong growing, forming an upright conical crown when young, this has thick shoots and big heart shaped leaves up to 25x18cm. Hardy and suited to any normal or wet soil.

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Pourthiaea aff. arguta KR 10738

Collected in Arunachal Pradesh, Far NE India, this Rosaceous large shrub to small tree is very closely allied to Photinia and is also known as that. Creamy white flowers in terminal corymbs in spring/summer followed by red fruit in autumn. Leaves are relatively narrow, sprinkled with white hair when young and semi-persistent in winter. Hardiness untested.

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Prunus himalaica

Closely related to both P. serrula and P. rufa, this is also grown for its wonderful bark; deep mahogany with very heavy horizontal lenticel banding creating a striking effect. A small tree, introduced from Nepal in only 1965, this usually branches low into multiple stems; all the better for seeing the bark effects. Softly hairy serrated foliage and pale flowers in spring.

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Prunus ilicifolia subsp. lyonii

The Catalina cherry hails from the Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California where it grows with such delights as Lyonothamnus etc. An evergreen large shrub with glossy foliage and racemes of white flowers in June/July up to 13cm long, followed by rounded fruit, starting red and turning black. For a sheltered position. Rarely seen or offered.

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Prunus lusitanica subsp. azorica

Prunus lusitanica subsp. azorica

A superb, rarely encountered, surprisingly hardy evergreen large shrub or small tree from the Azores. Larger, thicker leaves than normal Portuguese Laurel, reddish when young, turning a brighter green with red petioles, and with the same pretty racemes of white flowers in June. Tolerant of most soils. A very pleasing foliage plant, demanding wider planting.

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Prunus sp. NJM 13.108

Found at 1950m in Nagaland, NE India, this was a deciduous tree to 13m tall. Foliage is fairly substantial for a cherry. Flowers unseen.

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Pseudolarix amabilis

A very attractive slow growing, very hardy, deciduous Chinese conifer superficially similar to Larch, but with longer thicker leaves bright, light green all summer, turning a striking rich golden-yellow in autumn. The little cones that stud the branches resemble small artichokes. Potentially a medium sized tree.

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Pseudopanax 'Tuatara' (new)

Recently raised in New Zealand, this hybrid Pseudopanax has leathery purple-tinted dark green foliage with three very narrow divergent leaflets, lined with prominent forward pointing teeth. To probably about 2m tall, this is well suited to coastal gardens and other mild areas. Great in a pot.

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Pseudopanax crassifolius (new)

The Lancewood from New Zealand has an unmistakable growth form. For years as a youth it grows strongly upward with very slim evergreen leaves up to 60cm long pointing rigidly downwards at an angle. Usually dark purple-brown-green, they become much shorter in adulthood when the plant changes into a dense lollipop-shaped tree. Survived 2010 in Oxfordshire!

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Pseudopanax crassifolius f. trifoliolatus

Most unusual and totally bizarre, this is a three lobed form of a bizarre looking plant at the best of times. Each dark-brown tinged rigid leaf is composed of three very narrow, linear lobes. These are produced around the slim vertical narrow stem, to about 5m, when the plant will enter adult stage and broaden its crown. Fairly hardy but not for the coldest areas.

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Pterocarya fraxinifolia 'Abbotsbury Giant'

Cuttings from one of the particularly huge specimens at Abbotsbury Subtropical gardens in Dorset, where they are considerably larger than any other specimens in the British Isles. A vigorous tough, tolerant tree from the Caucasus to N. Iran with pinnate foliage up to 60cm long and female inflorescences up to 50cm. Loves wet sites, but isn't demanding of them.

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Displaying 41 to 60 of 65 results, sorted alphabetically.
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